Sunday, February 21, 2010

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The Brit Locker

You've probably already heard about the champions from the ceremony across the pond. Just in case you need a refresher, though:

BEST PICTURE went to The Hurt Locker. I hope this, once and for all, puts the final nail in the coffin for the silly "something other than The Hurt Locker will win" articles. I don't think the new voting system matters; The Hurt Locker has the necessary support to take it all March 7. Especially since this American production won over homegrown An Education, something not even No Country for Old Men could accomplish (it lost to Atonement). Now, I know the only Oscar-BAFTA matches in this category in the past ten years are Gladiator, LOTR: ROTK and Slumdog Millionaire, but the planets are in alignment, the cards are dealt, and The Hurt Locker is going to win.

An Education even lost to Fish Tank for OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM. I hear it's very good, this Fish Tank, but I haven't seen it yet.

The Hurt Locker's greatest asset, of course, has been the champion of the season (Globes notwithstanding), and it was no different here: Kathryn Bigelow won BEST DIRECTOR, which will be repeated at the Academy Awards, making her the sexiest winner in this category since...hm. Redford?

Colin Firth's BEST ACTOR win was deserved and just. I don't expect this to be repeated at the Oscars, but he's the best damn actor in the category. His award here will go down in my mind as the true results.

BEST ACTRESS went to Carey Mulligan, which I can see happening at the Oscars in case of Streep and Bullock splitting it. I'm glad she won. She's absolutely fantastic in An Education.

Christoph Waltz and Mo'Nique won BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR and BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS, respectively. Same old song.

Mark Boal, writer of The Hurt Locker, won for BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY, an award many people expect Quentin Tarantino and Inglourious Basterds to win at the Oscars. Me, I find Boal, Bigelow and the Hurt Locker train unstoppable. Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner won for BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY for Up in the Air. Same old song.

Michael Giacchino's Up score took top honors in BEST MUSIC. Giacchino, who also composed the Star Trek score this year, in addition to Pixar's Ratatouille and The Incredibles and the modern classic Speed Racer, has been waiting for major awards recognition. This is his year.

And Barry Ackroyd won BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY for The Hurt Locker. Indeed, only in VFX and Best Actor did the film not come up as champion. Just take a look at the rest of the honors:

BEST EDITING, BEST SOUND
The Hurt Locker

BEST COSTUME DESIGN, BEST MAKEUP/HAIR
The Young Victoria

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN, BEST VFX
Avatar

OUTSTANDING BRITISH DEBUT
Moon

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Un Prophete

ANIMATED FILM
Up

SHORT FILM
I Do Air

SHORT ANIMATION
Mother of Many

ORANGE RISING STAR
Kristen Stewart

The most any film won is two, save for The Hurt Locker, which championed in six categories. Even the Brits know: The Hurt Locker is the film to beat.

4 comments:

Amanda said...

I dunno, Marty's pretty sexy.

I approve of these winners.

TomS said...

Thanks for your post about the British Academy Awards! Your analysis of the winners is well-reasoned.

I fear a different outcome at the Academy Awards. The expanding field of BP nominees was an unapologetic appeal to "populism"; that, and the huge number of people who worked on Avatar adding to its potential voters, would make it seem that "Avatar" is likely to win.

I am pulling for an underdog upset, however.... "Hurt Locker" would be a worthy choice.

Caleb Strul said...

Gotta love that debut category... and best actor is clearly deserved. I think I'll prefer these awards to the american version, but who knows?

Jude said...

Carey Mulligan is so adorable. I only wish Anna Kendrick could have won to have officialy made the BAFTAs the cutest starlet-awards ceremony.